Welcome!

Casajack is a b&b located 20 km from Naples airport and at a 30-minute drive from the "Napoli Centrale" station.

Garden & Terrace

The garden and terrace overlook the bay of Pozzuoli – a very quiet place if you need to work, study or simply read a book.

Room

Your room features a double bed, wardrobe, bathroom with shower, heating and A/C, free wifi.

About us

We work from home, so we are around most of the time if you need assistance or just want to have a chat – we'll be happy to give you as many info as you may need!

Have a nice stay!

If you are into archeology, scuba diving, sailing, hiking, theatre shows, shopping – you name it! – everything is at a walking distance or easily accessible by public transport, car or taxi. Free parking space is available, too.

The Amphitheatre is just one block away and the amazing Rione Terra is at a walking distance; from the port you can enjoy day trips to Ischia or Procida. Boats to Capri leave from Naples, and from the nearby metro station you can reach downtown in a few minutes. 

Pozzuoli

Flavian Amphitheatre

The Flavian Amphitheater is the third largest Roman amphitheater in Italy. Only the Roman Colosseum and the Capuan Amphitheater are larger. It was likely built by the same architects who previously constructed the Roman Colosseum.

45 mins

500 m.

Beginner

Out of curiosity...

A minor amphitheater, very close to the Flavian one, was absorbed by other buildings, but some arches can be seen in Via Solfatara and Via Vigna. It is crossed by the metropolitan railway, while the arena is still buried

Pozzuoli

Temple of Neptune – Hadrian's Baths

Remains of a thermal complex in Corso Terracciano.

15 mins

300 m.

Beginner

Out of curiosity...

Hadrian Baths includes also "Dianae Nymphaeum", which is partially hidden by buildings.

Pozzuoli

Necropolis of via Celle

A rich complex of tombs and mausoleums, just across an old Roman street track which is still being used today (Via Cupa Cigliano).

30 mins

250 m.

Beginner

Out of curiosity...

Pozzuoli, after Rome, is the only city in Italy – perhaps in the world – which houses a majestic and impressive complex of mausoleums, columbaria and hypogea. The necropolis starts from today's Via Celle and continues up to Quarto, along the sides of Via Consolare Campana that from Puteoli once led to Capua.

Pozzuoli

Rione Terra

Rione Terra, the first settlement of Puteoli, was originally known as Dicearkia in Greek. It is a multi-layered city with several Roman buildings; the most important one is the Temple of Augustus (today Pozzuoli's Cathedral).

120 mins

1,6 km

Beginner

Out of curiosity...

The Temple of August was built by Lucio Calpurnio from 27 b.C. to 14 d.C. on the remains of a podium of a Samnite temple dating back to the 5th century b.C. The temple was turned into a Christian church and dedicated to the martyred San Procolo. The Roman structures of the building, hidden by the baroque reconstruction (1632-1647), semi-demolished by a fire on the night between 16 and 17 May 1964, have been recently brought to light.

Pozzuoli

Macellum

The Macellum of Pozzuoli, also known as the Temple of Serapis or Serapeum, is considered the symbol of the city. The "temple" was actually a marketplace. Its name derives from the misinterpretation of its function, when a statue of the god Serapis was found in 1750 at this location.

30 mins

1 km

Beginner

Out of curiosity...

The Macellum includes three majestic columns in Cipollino marble, which show erosion from marine Lithophaga molluscs when, at an earlier time, the ground level was much lower due to Bradyseism, and sea-water could flow in.

Baiae

Sunken city

Baiae was a mineral springs and coastal resort on the northwestern shore of the Gulf of Naples. It was fashionable for centuries during antiquity, particularly towards the end of the Roman Republic, when it was reckoned as superior to Pompeii, Herculaneum, and Capri for the super-rich. It later formed part of Port Julius, the base of the western fleet of the Imperial Roman Navy. It was deserted and its ruins largely submerged by local volcanic activity during Renaissance.

60 mins

5,6 km

Expert

Out of curiosity...

Baiae was a place of incredible wealth, but the glitter and opulence hid a dark side. Rome's elite came here to scheme and conspire, and it was the setting for one of the most sinister murder plots of the Roman age. Baiae played a pivotal role in the Roman Empire. Then, disaster struck. Half the city sank beneath the waves and was forgotten for over a thousand years.

Pozzuoli

Solfatara

Solfatara is a shallow volcanic crater, part of the Campi Flegrei volcanic area. It is a dormant volcano, which still emits jets of steam with sulfurous fumes. The crater floor is a popular tourist attraction, as it has many fumaroles and mud pools. The area is well known for its bradyseism. The vapours have been used for medical purposes since Roman times.

60 min.

2,4 km

Facile

Out of curiosity...

The name comes from the Latin, Sulpha terra, "land of sulfur". It was formed around 4000 years ago and last erupted in 1198 with what was probably a phreatic eruption - an explosive steam-driven eruption caused by groundwater interacting with magma.

Pozzuoli

Lake Avernus

Lake Avernus, in which Virgil, in the 6th book of his Aeneid, placed the entrance to Hell. Nearby are the Temple of Apollo, the Grotto of the Cumaean Sibyl and Cocceius' Grotto, a gallery carved by the Romans to connect Lucrino to Cumae. The latter was damaged during World War II and is no longer visitable.

60 mins

5,6 km

Beginner

Out of curiosity...

The name derives from Greek, and means "Without Birds", referring to the absence of birds due to the sulfur gas that sprung from it.

Napoli

Isle of Procida

Geologically, Procida was created by the eruption of four volcanoes, now dormant and submerged. Some 16th-15th b.C. Achaean objects have been found on Procida. Traces have also been found on Vivara, an islet off the southwestern coast of Procida. The first historically attested Greek settlers arrived from the Aegean Sea to this island during the 8th b.C., followed by other Greeks coming from Cuma.

1 day

900 m + ferry

Intermediate

Out of curiosity...

The island is mentioned by the Roman satirist Juvenal, in Sat. 3, 5, as a barren place. Later during Roman rule, Procida became a renowned resort for the patrician class of Rome.

Napoli

Isle of Ischia

It is the largest of the Phlegrean Islands. Ischia's main industry is tourism, centering on thermal spas that cater mostly to European (especially German) and Asian tourists eager to enjoy the fruits of the island's natural volcanic activity, its hot springs, and its volcanic mud.

1 day

900 m. + ferry

Intermediate

Out of curiosity...

Virgil poetically referred to it as Inarime and still later as Arime. The Romans called it Aenaria, the Greeks Pithekoūsai. (In)arime and Pithekousai both appear to derive from words for "monkey". Pliny explained the Latin name Aenaria as connected to a landing by Aeneas. If the island actually was, like Gibraltar, home to a population of monkeys, they were already extinct by historical times as no record is found in ancient sources.

Napoli

Isle of Capri

Capri has been a holiday resort since the time of the Roman Republic. Some of the main features of the island include the following: the Marina Piccola (the little harbour), the Belvedere of Tragara (a high panoramic promenade lined with villas), the limestone crags called sea stacks that project above the sea (the Faraglioni), the town of Anacapri, the Blue Grotto (Grotta Azzurra), and the ruins of the Imperial Roman villas.

1 day

15 km + ferry

Intermediate

Out of curiosity...

The isle has been inhabited since early times. Evidence of human settlement was discovered during the Roman era; according to Suetonius, when the foundations for the villa of Augustus were being excavated, giant bones and 'weapons of stone' were discovered. The emperor ordered these to be displayed in the garden of his main residence, the Sea Palace. Augustus developed Capri; he built temples, villas, aqueducts, and planted gardens so he could enjoy his private paradise. Augustus' successor Tiberius built a series of villas at Capri, the most famous of which is the Villa Jovis, one of the best-preserved Roman villas in Italy. In 27 AD, Tiberius permanently moved to Capri, running the Empire from there until his death in 37 AD.

Rates

Arrangements can be made for private lunch/dinner parties (6/8 pax.)

reviews

  • Carmela Lina G.

    Napoli

    Un angolo di paradiso. Ogni volta un momento di serenità e spensieratezza. Gli host due persone incredibilmente attente, disponibili e discreti. Non potrei fare a meno della loro compagnia con amabili conversazioni nel loro giardino coperto.

  • Antonello P.

    Roma

    Massima ospitalità, vista mozzafiato e... sei subito a casa tua! Non vorresti mai andare via

  • Rosamaria L.

    Napoli

    Ottima ospitalità da parte di due squisite persone. L'alloggio è particolarmente bello, fra vista sul mare, giardino, silenzio, comodità. Io ci sono stata sempre benissimo.

  • Marisa L.

    Napoli

    Prima di tutto persone splendide poi anche la casa e il panorama, splendidi!

  • Giorgio M.

    Varcaturo (NA)

    Ottima accoglienza e location mozzafiato. Un indirizzo da tenere in rubrica assolutamente.

  • Rosy C.

    Verona

    La mia preferita.

  • Biancamaria R.

    Bovino (FG)

    Più volte ospiti della splendida location, la consigliamo a quanti vogliano sentirsi "coccolati" e godere della simpatia dei gestori!

  • Susi P.

    Napoli

    Posto favoloso, ospitalità eccellente.

info@casajack.it